Watercolor is one of the most simple forms of fine art when it comes to supplies, but one of the most difficult forms to master. Watercolor painters are most known for their abilities to see detail in the ordinary and for their understanding of how color works individually and in collaboration with one another. If you ever want to experiment with watercolors yourself, here is a list of painters that you should emulate that have been widely recognized as masters of the art form:

First is J.M.W. Turner, who discovered watercolor as a medium for plein air painting in the late 1700s. Turner painted mostly expressive paintings of the European countryside and ocean, which “anticipated the Impressionist movement by over 50 years and turned landscape painting into a vital discipline where it had previously been the domain of amateur naturalists and hobbyists,” (Heaston, Discover the Great Watercolor Artists).

Deborah Y Strauss, DVM

Another well-known British watercolor expert is James McNeill Whistler, recognized for his use of short brush stroked and small dabs of color – the antithesis of his oil paintings, many of which you probably know. Whistler could always be found sketching images of everyday life wherever he was, and used those sketches as the basis for his beautiful paintings.

Deborah Y Strauss, DVM

Winslow Homer is one of the most important watercolor artists in the 19th century. He was “a largely self-taught painter who embraced watercolor so thoroughly for his many landscapes, seascapes and scenes of everyday life in 19th century America,” (Heaston, Discover the Great Watercolor Artists). Many contemporary artists interested in watercolor often look at Homer’s works for inspiration.

Deborah Y Strauss, DVM

Another great artist, especially known for her creativity and attentiveness with watercolors, is Georgia O’Keeffe. After moving to a the rural environment of New Mexico, O’Keeffe often used vibrant colors and light in her paintings as a reflection of the atmosphere she was surrounded by.

Deborah Y Strauss, DVM

Last on this list is Jamie Wyeth, an American painter who often used drypoint watercolors in her work. Drypoint watercolors means that very little water is used throughout the painting process. Wyeth’s parents were both widely recognized painters in America, and many of his paintings reflect scenes of New England that you can be witness to today.

Deborah Y Strauss, DVM

It is clear that throughout the years watercolor has be used to create beautiful works that display a time, place, and emotion of a painter – something that we can still commemorate as we discover new artists and our own appreciation for watercolors. For more information about famous watercolor painters, please read this article published by Craftsy.com.